Bedrock Standard
WordPress
WordPlate WP-Stack
Separate configs per environment
Environment variables
Enhanced security
Custom wp-content directory
Composer for managing WordPress installation
Composer for managing WordPress plugins and themes
PSR-2 coding standards
mu-plugins autoloader

Bedrock’s structure

site/
├── config/
│   ├── environments/
│   │   ├── development.php
│   │   ├── staging.php
│   │   └── production.php
│   └── application.php   # Primary wp-config.php
├── vendor/               # Composer dependencies
└── web/                  # Virtual host document root
    ├── app/              # WordPress content directory
    │   ├── mu-plugins/
    │   ├── plugins/
    │   ├── themes/
    │   └── uploads/
    └── wp/               # WordPress core

Standard WordPress structure

site/
├── index.php
├── license.txt
├── readme.html
├── wp-activate.php
├── wp-admin/
├── wp-blog-header.php
├── wp-comments-post.php
├── wp-config-sample.php
├── wp-content/
│   ├── index.php
│   ├── plugins/
│   └── themes/
├── wp-cron.php
├── wp-includes/
├── wp-links-opml.php
├── wp-load.php
├── wp-login.php
├── wp-mail.php
├── wp-settings.php
├── wp-signup.php
├── wp-trackback.php
└── xmlrpc.php

Better security

Bedrock’s web root is isolated to limit access to non-web files. Bedrock also has more secure passwords through the wp-password-bcrypt plugin.

Bedrock is doing a huge service to the WordPress community, and I can see it being adopted as the standard for WordPress development. Hopefully as more people adopt it, the developer community at large will view WordPress sites on similar footing as more "professional" platforms.

Daniel Strunk